In Case You Missed It: StreetsPAC's Endorsees for State Senate and Assembly!

Last week, we endorsed five candidates for the State Senate and six candidates for the Assembly. In case you missed our announcement, read on for a closer look at the terrific candidates we're backing in September's primary. We hope you'll be inspired to volunteer with us to help their campaigns – you can sign up right now to do that here.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

StreetsPAC Makes Endorsements in State Senate and Assembly Races

StreetsPAC today made several endorsements in races for New York State’s legislature, backing five candidates for the State Senate and six candidates for the Assembly. All five candidates we're endorsing for the State Senate are challenging sitting Senators, while four of the six Assembly candidates we're supporting are incumbents.  All of the races in which we're endorsing a candidate are for seats representing districts within New York City.

The events of the past couple months have once again made it clear that the New York State Senate is badly broken. The Senate’s failure to renew New York City’s speed camera program, which had made the streets around city schools demonstrably safer, established a new low, which isn't easy in Albany. However, we’re confident that the candidates we’re endorsing today will help transform the Senate into a legislative body that actually cares about the safety of our streets, and one that will treat our transportation system as the vital system on which so many of us rely. The same is true of the candidates we’re endorsing in State Assembly races.

Speed cameras have become a major electoral issue as a result of the Senate’s inaction, and they’re immensely popular with voters. It’s clear to us that the current makeup of the State Senate is an enormous obstacle to good street-safety policy, so we obviously need to work to change that dynamic. In the Assembly, on the other hand, we’re looking to support people who have, and will, make safe streets and improved transit a priority.

Of the five State Senate candidates we're endorsing today, three are running for seats representing Brooklyn, while the other two are contending for seats in Manhattan and the Bronx, respectively.

Meet all our endorsees after the jump.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Calling All Volunteers!

Senate Republicans Kill NYC's Speed Camera Program – Join Us to Hold Them Accountable!

New York City's life-saving speed safety cameras were shut down on July 25th at 5:30 p.m., thanks to Republicans in the New York State Senate, who failed to hold a vote on a reauthorization and expansion bill that the State Assembly passed several weeks ago.

Despite the overwhelming evidence of the effectiveness of speed cameras – speeding has dropped by 63% in locations where the cameras have been installed, pedestrian injuries have declined by 23%, and four out of five drivers wise up fast and never receive a second ticket – Republican Majority Leader John Flanagan refused to recall the Senate for a vote. The speed camera bill was bottled up in the Cities Committee by turncoat "Democrat" Simcha Felder, who caucuses with Republicans, and Bay Ridge Senator Martin Golden, an ostensible co-sponsor of the bill, did next to nothing to move it to a vote.

FlanaganFelderGolden.jpg

If the State Senate will not act to protect New York City's children from speeding drivers, we need to act to change the State Senate.

And that's where you come in. We're mounting an effort to change the Senate this fall, and we need volunteers to join us to hit the streets, knock on doors and help elect candidates who will put the safety of New Yorkers before petty party politics.

Can we count on your help? It takes just a moment to click here and volunteer, and we'll follow up soon with next steps. It's literally a matter of life and death.

Add your reaction Share

Reminder: Join Us to Bike to Work Tomorrow!

Join Us Tomorrow to Bike to Work with the City Council's Progressive Caucus!

Tomorrow – Wednesday, May 16 – please join us to celebrate Bike Month with our 5th Annual Bike to Work ride with the New York City Council's Progressive Caucus.

Bike_to_Work_2018_Flyer_v3.jpgWe'll have two rides converging at City Hall for a 9:00 a.m. rally. One will meet up on the plaza behind Brooklyn Borough Hall at 8:00 a.m., and the other will gather at the 14th Street steps at Union Square in Manhattan at 8:30 a.m.

In addition, there are a couple of feeder rides for people coming from farther out. One feeder ride will convene on Manhattan's Upper East Side, at the district office of Council Member Ben Kallos, at 244 East 93rd Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues. Gather at 7 a.m. for the ride to Union Square.

In Brooklyn, there will be a group riding from Grand Army Plaza to Borough Hall. Meet up and be ready to ride by 7:30 a.m.

Additional feeder rides from the East Village and Greenpoint/Williamsburg are also planned.

Join us, along with partner organizations Transportation Alternatives, Bike New York and Get Women Cycling, for this fun, casual ride, and the chance to bike side by side with some of the Progressive Caucus's most dedicate advocates for safe streets.

Please RSVP to znasir@council.nyc.gov, and if you don't have your own wheels, you can request a Citi Bike with your RSVP.

One note about the weather: we plan to ride rain or shine, and the forecast looks ok before 10 a.m., but use your judgment if things look ominous.

Add your reaction Share

Join Us to Bike to Work on May 16!

Join Us May 16 to Bike to Work with the City Council's Progressive Caucus!

Next Wednesday, May 16, we're going to be celebrating Bike Month with our 5th Annual Bike to Work event with the New York City Council's Progressive Caucus, and we hope you'll saddle up and ride with us.Bike_to_Work_2018_Flyer_v3.jpg

There are two main rides, one meeting up on the plaza behind Brooklyn Borough Hall at 8:00 a.m., and the other gathering on the 14th Street steps at Union Square in Manhattan at 8:30 a.m.  The rides will converge at City Hall for a rally at 9:00 a.m. Don't miss this annual opportunity to strike a pose with your bike on the steps of City Hall.

In addition, there are a couple of feeder rides for people coming from farther out. One feeder ride will meet up on Manhattan's Upper East Side, at the district office of Council Member Ben Kallos, at 244 East 93rd Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues. Gather at 7 a.m. for the ride to Union Square.

In Brooklyn, there will be a group riding from Grand Army Plaza to Borough Hall. Meet up and be ready to ride by 7:30 a.m.

Please join us, along with partner organizations Transportation Alternatives, Bike New York and Get Women Cycling, for this fun, casual ride, and the chance to bike side by side with some of the Progressive Caucus's most dedicate advocates for safe streets.

Please RSVP to znasir@council.nyc.gov, and if you don't have your own wheels, you can request a Citi Bike with your RSVP.

See you on the 16th!

Add your reaction Share

Bike to Work May 16; Car-Free Central Park; Lobby in Albany for Speed Safety Cameras

Join Us May 16 to Bike to Work with the City Council's Progressive Caucus!

On Wednesday, May 16, we're going to be celebrating Bike Month with our 5th Annual Bike to Work event with the New York City Council's Progressive Caucus, and we hope you'll saddle up and ride with us.Bike_to_Work_2018_Flyer_v3.jpg

We'll have two feeder rides, one meeting up on the plaza behind Brooklyn Borough Hall at 8:00 a.m., and the other gathering on the 14th Street steps at Union Square in Manhattan at 8:30 a.m.  The rides will converge at City Hall for a rally at 9:00 a.m. Don't miss your once-a-year chance to pose with your bike on the steps of City Hall!

Please join us, along with partner organizations Transportation Alternatives, Bike New York and Get Women Cycling, for this fun, casual ride, and the opportunity to bike side by side with some of the Progressive Caucus's most dedicate advocates for safe streets.

Please RSVP to znasir@council.nyc.gov, and if you don't have access to a bike, request a Citi Bike with your RSVP.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Car Free Earth Day; Bike to Work with BP Adams; Congestion Testimony

Car Free Earth Day, This Saturday, April 21st

Just a quick reminder that the city's Car Free Earth Day 2018, which will open 30 blocks of Broadway from Times Square to Union Square, takes place this Saturday, April 21st, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

There will be programming at several rest stops along the route, including free arts performances, and plenty of car-free space to stroll or bike through the heart of Midtown. The forecast is for plenty of sunshine and a temperature around 60°!

image_002.jpg

For more information, including details on satellite Car Free Earth Day events in Washington Heights and Downtown Brooklyn, please visit NYC DOT's official Car Free Earth Day web page.

Reminder: Kick Off Earth Week by Biking to Work with Brooklyn BP Eric Adams

BikeToWork.jpgThis coming Monday, April 23, we're joining Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams for his annual Earth Week Bike-to-Work event. The ride is open to all, so we hope you'll come ride along.

We'll meet up at the Willink Entrance to Brooklyn's Prospect Park, on Flatbush Avenue just north of the intersection of Empire Boulevard and Ocean Avenue. After some remarks from the Borough President, we'll ride north up Flatbush Avenue to Grand Army Plaza, take the Prospect Park West bike path to 9th Street, head down 9th Street to Clinton Street (stopping at 5th Avenue to remember Abigail Blumenstein and Joshua Lew), and then we'll proceed up Clinton to Remsen Street and Brooklyn Borough Hall.

Monday should see a repeat of Saturday's weather – sunny and maybe even a bit warmer – so in other words, perfect biking conditions. Take advantage and come ride with us!

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Testimony to City Council on Congestion; Bike to Work for Earth Week; Fair Fares; Car Free Day

StreetsPAC Testifies at City Council Hearing on Traffic Congestion

This past Tuesday, the City Council's Committee on Transportation held an oversight hearing on ways to address traffic congestion, and StreetsPAC was at City Hall to testify.

The increasing burden of congestion has been well documented; the Partnership for New York City estimates that traffic backups cost the city some $20 billion every year. And yet, despite Governor Cuomo calling congestion pricing "an idea whose time has come" last summer, the common-sense fixes recommended by his own Fix NYC panel were largely ignored by the Governor and Legislature in their recently concluded budget negotiations.

In addition, Mayor de Blasio's own Congestion Action Plan, released in October, appears to be little more than tinkering around the edges. While some aspects of it are useful, the plan mostly amounts to "inconsequential suggestions to a problem that is so grave," in the words of City Council Member Antonio Reynoso.

While it's clear that what is needed is for Albany to pass a full-blown congestion-pricing plan for New York City, there are more constructive steps that the city can take on its own, and we highlighted a half-dozen of them in our testimony, which you can read in full here.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

StreetsPAC's Testimony to City Council on Addressing Traffic Congestion

StreetsPAC presented the following testimony earlier this week to the New York City Council's Committee on Transportation, at its oversight hearing on addressing traffic congestion:

Today’s oversight hearing is critical in light of the failure of the Governor and State Legislature to take meaningful action on congestion in the budget process just concluded. While the surcharge on ride-hailing vehicles and taxis will generate a fair amount of revenue, such a limited first-stab at dealing with congestion will have minimal effect on actually solving the problem.

Albany is not alone in deserving criticism, however. Mayor de Blasio, who for months has repeated, without foundation, that a congestion charge is somehow “regressive,” has done much to provide opponents of a comprehensive congestion-reduction effort with political cover. While his Millionaire’s Tax isn’t a bad idea for helping to fund and fix the MTA, it does nothing to address the twin crisis of crippling traffic.

Additionally, while the Congestion Action Plan the Mayor announced in October includes some good and sensible ideas, it amounts to tinkering around the edges. Cracking down on blocking the box and keeping curbs and travel lanes clear during peak hours are useful steps, but the program’s reliance on human enforcement guarantees that it will have limited effect.

What we really need is bold action, on a large scale and with an unwavering commitment to fixing the problem. Here are a half-dozen steps the Council can take to break gridlock’s hold on New York City.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

New York State Budget Comes Up Well Short in Addressing Grave Transit and Congestion Crisis

StreetsPAC joined Transportation Alternatives, the Straphangers Campaign and the Riders Alliance in issuing the following statement regarding the budget passed by the New York State Legislature early this morning:

"Our transit system is on life support. Fixing our transit system should have been Albany's first priority this year; unfortunately, the final budget does not offer a credible plan to modernize the MTA, nor provide a sufficient revenue stream to make it possible. The crisis in our subways and on our streets will continue, and New Yorkers will continue to demand action from Governor Cuomo and state lawmakers.

"If the governor is serious about alleviating the crisis, he must ensure that the initial steps laid out in this budget -- for-hire vehicle surcharges, bus lane expansion and enforcement -- be the catalyst for meaningful reform.

"First, Governor Cuomo must use a portion of the new revenue to help implement comprehensive congestion pricing, by constructing cordon infrastructure and addressing needs in transit deserts around the city. Then, the governor must establish, and commit to, a timeline to make congestion pricing a reality in New York.

"New York's transit and traffic problems may seem intractable, but with bold leadership, reform is possible. New Yorkers deserve better than broken subways, unsafe streets, and crippling gridlock, and it's time for our representatives to deliver."

Add your reaction Share

← Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9    16  17  Next →
StreetsPAC
StreetsPAC supports candidates for public office who will champion Safe, Complete and Livable Streets.